The most beautiful bridges in the world



Slide 1 of 21: Bridges link the shores of lakes and rivers or simply reduce travel time. In addition to being efficient, these large structures sometimes take on stupefying forms. All over the world, engineers and architects have combined utility and beauty to build the planet's most magnificent bridges.
Slide 2 of 21: Bixby Bridge is undoubtedly California's most “Instagrammable” human-made structure. Befittingly nicknamed the Golden Gate of Big Sur, Bixby spans a canyon at a height of 79 metres (260 feet), offering dizzying views of the Pacific Ocean.
Slide 3 of 21: Visitors agree: Walking along this glass-floored pedestrian bridge in Alberta's Jasper National Park really gets your adrenalin pumping! What's more, the 280-metre-high (920-foot-high) transparent walkway provides a spectacular panoramic view of the Canadian Rockies.
Slide 4 of 21: Shanghai's Nanpu Bridge ranks high among the world's most beautiful bridges. Locals and tourists alike marvel at its spiralling approach, designed to provide drivers with an easy slope and reduce the bridge's urban footprint.

Slide 5 of 21: Rising to 343 metres (1,125 feet), France's Viaduc de Millau holds the world record for height. In fact, this exceptional structure tops the Eiffel Tower by 19 metres (62 feet). Several visitors have compared crossing the Viaduc de Millau to a walk above the clouds, and its minimalist design harmonizes perfectly with the green valley over which it soars.
Slide 6 of 21: A veritable work of art, the Seri Wawasan Bridge's unique and fascinating architecture took inspiration from a ship's sails. This Malaysian structure features a single pylon inclined 15 degrees, while the bridge is suspended from numerous cable stays positioned to resemble wind-filled sails.
Slide 7 of 21: The Pont du Gard embodies Roman creative genius in all its splendour. At 49 metres (160 feet) high, this first-century construction is the highest Roman aqueduct bridge in the world. It's also the only three-level bridge from ancient times still standing today.
Slide 8 of 21: The Khaju Bridge is a perfect illustration of the finesse that defines Persian architecture. Decorated with paintings and ceramic tiles, the structure's architectural beauty astounds visitors. The bridge is also a dam that irrigates nearby gardens.
Slide 9 of 21: There's a good reason why the Sunniberg Bridge won the prestigious Outstanding Structure Award in 2001. Its innovative design and thoughtful aesthetic are certainly worthy of praise. Despite the Sunniberg Bridge's remarkable height, it was actually designed to blend in with the landscape of this Swiss canton.

Slide 10 of 21: Nothing's more magical and romantic than a stroll along Devil's Bridge in Germany. Don't let its name fool you. While legend has it that this perfectly round stone arch was made by the devil himself, there's nothing diabolical about this medieval structure. It's simply an architectural feat of such precision that the bridge's reflection in the water forms a perfect circle—a true photographer's paradise!
Slide 11 of 21: The pedestrian walkway running along the iconic Brooklyn Bridge offers an unbeatable view of the Big Apple. Considered one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States, the structure links the renowned Brooklyn and Upper East Side (Manhattan) neighbourhoods.
Slide 12 of 21: Built 36 metres (120 feet) above the ground, Henderson Waves is Singapore’s highest pedestrian bridge. Its wavelike architecture was designed to create a variety of quiet, secluded spaces that attract couples, joggers, and families visiting the walkway on weekends.
Slide 13 of 21: A trip to Prague wouldn't be complete without a visit to the Charles Bridge. Dozens of immense statues run the length of the second-oldest bridge in the Czech Republic. Its rich history, along with a few urban legends, have kept this 700-year-old pedestrian walkway a popular destination to this day.
Slide 14 of 21: The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco's emblematic structure, is considered one of the seven wonders of the modern world. The bridge's idyllic location and bright orange hue have likely played a large role in its worldwide fame.

Slide 15 of 21: Tower Bridge is, undoubtedly, the world's most famous bascule bridge. Dating back to 1894, this structure spans the River Thames and welcomes nearly 40,000 users every day. Its two majestic towers and architecture reminiscent of European castles leave no one unmoved.
Slide 16 of 21: The Rialto Bridge is the oldest and most renowned bridge in Venice, Italy. It was built in the late 1500s to replace a wooden bridge that had collapsed twice.
Slide 17 of 21: Every day, nearly 150,000 vehicles cross the Sydney Harbour Bridge. In addition to serving as an important symbol of the city, this immense iron arch, nicknamed the “Coat Hanger” by local residents, has become a tourist attraction. Visitors can take part in climbing excursions to the top of the bridge.
Slide 18 of 21: Inaugurated in 2018, the Golden Bridge (Cầu Vàng in Vietnamese) boasts a most surprising architecture. This pedestrian walkway, located in Da Nang, appears to be supported by two enormous hands. Rising to a height of 1,000 metres (3,280 feet), this Vietnamese structure offers a stunning view of the surrounding mountains.
Slide 19 of 21: Named in honour of a former Brazilian president, the “JK” Bridge displays an asymmetrical architectural prowess. Its curved design was inspired by the ricochets of a stone skipping across water. The modern structure stretches 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mile) across Lake Paranoá.
Slide 20 of 21: The root bridges found in India's Meghalaya forest seem straight out of an adventure novel. Known as one of the world's wettest regions, Cherrapunji is home to no fewer than 11 living bridges, all perfectly functional and used by locals.
Slide 21 of 21: There are only seven ways to get across the 1,200-kilometre-long (750-mile-long) Colorado River in the United States. One, the splendid Navajo Bridge in Arizona, is actually a double structure. The old Navajo Bridge, replaced by a wider and more robust construction in 1995, was never destroyed. It now serves as a pedestrian crossing.

The most beautiful bridges in the world

Bridges link the shores of lakes and rivers or simply reduce travel time. In addition to being efficient, these large structures sometimes take on stupefying forms. All over the world, engineers and architects have combined utility and beauty to build the planet’s most magnificent bridges.

Bixby Bridge, California

Bixby Bridge is undoubtedly California’s most “Instagrammable” human-made structure. Befittingly nicknamed the Golden Gate of Big Sur, Bixby spans a canyon at a height of 79 metres (260 feet), offering dizzying views of the Pacific Ocean.

Columbia Icefield Skywalk, Canada

Visitors agree: Walking along this glass-floored pedestrian bridge in Alberta’s Jasper National Park really gets your adrenalin pumping! What’s more, the 280-metre-high (920-foot-high) transparent walkway provides a spectacular panoramic view of the Canadian Rockies.

Nanpu Bridge, China

Shanghai’s Nanpu Bridge ranks high among the world’s most beautiful bridges. Locals and tourists alike marvel at its spiralling approach, designed to provide drivers with an easy slope and reduce the bridge’s urban footprint.

Viaduc de Millau, France

Rising to 343 metres (1,125 feet), France’s Viaduc de Millau holds the world record for height. In fact, this exceptional structure tops the Eiffel Tower by 19 metres (62 feet). Several visitors have compared crossing the Viaduc de Millau to a walk above the clouds, and its minimalist design harmonizes perfectly with the green valley over which it soars.

Seri Wawasan Bridge, Malaysia

A veritable work of art, the Seri Wawasan Bridge’s unique and fascinating architecture took inspiration from a ship’s sails. This Malaysian structure features a single pylon inclined 15 degrees, while the bridge is suspended from numerous cable stays positioned to resemble wind-filled sails.

Pont du Gard, France

The Pont du Gard embodies Roman creative genius in all its splendour. At 49 metres (160 feet) high, this first-century construction is the highest Roman aqueduct bridge in the world. It’s also the only three-level bridge from ancient times still standing today.

Khaju Bridge, Iran

The Khaju Bridge is a perfect illustration of the finesse that defines Persian architecture. Decorated with paintings and ceramic tiles, the structure’s architectural beauty astounds visitors. The bridge is also a dam that irrigates nearby gardens.

Sunniberg Bridge, Switzerland

There’s a good reason why the Sunniberg Bridge won the prestigious Outstanding Structure Award in 2001. Its innovative design and thoughtful aesthetic are certainly worthy of praise. Despite the Sunniberg Bridge’s remarkable height, it was actually designed to blend in with the landscape of this Swiss canton.

Devil’s Bridge, Germany

Nothing’s more magical and romantic than a stroll along Devil’s Bridge in Germany. Don’t let its name fool you. While legend has it that this perfectly round stone arch was made by the devil himself, there’s nothing diabolical about this medieval structure. It’s simply an architectural feat of such precision that the bridge’s reflection in the water forms a perfect circle—a true photographer’s paradise!

Brooklyn Bridge, New York

The pedestrian walkway running along the iconic Brooklyn Bridge offers an unbeatable view of the Big Apple. Considered one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States, the structure links the renowned Brooklyn and Upper East Side (Manhattan) neighbourhoods.

Henderson Waves Bridge, Singapore

Built 36 metres (120 feet) above the ground, Henderson Waves is Singapore’s highest pedestrian bridge. Its wavelike architecture was designed to create a variety of quiet, secluded spaces that attract couples, joggers, and families visiting the walkway on weekends.

Charles Bridge, Czech Republic

A trip to Prague wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the Charles Bridge. Dozens of immense statues run the length of the second-oldest bridge in the Czech Republic. Its rich history, along with a few urban legends, have kept this 700-year-old pedestrian walkway a popular destination to this day.

Golden Gate Bridge, California

The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco’s emblematic structure, is considered one of the seven wonders of the modern world. The bridge’s idyllic location and bright orange hue have likely played a large role in its worldwide fame.

Tower Bridge, London

Tower Bridge is, undoubtedly, the world’s most famous bascule bridge. Dating back to 1894, this structure spans the River Thames and welcomes nearly 40,000 users every day. Its two majestic towers and architecture reminiscent of European castles leave no one unmoved.

Rialto Bridge, Venice

The Rialto Bridge is the oldest and most renowned bridge in Venice, Italy. It was built in the late 1500s to replace a wooden bridge that had collapsed twice.

Sydney Harbour Bridge, Australia

Every day, nearly 150,000 vehicles cross the Sydney Harbour Bridge. In addition to serving as an important symbol of the city, this immense iron arch, nicknamed the “Coat Hanger” by local residents, has become a tourist attraction. Visitors can take part in climbing excursions to the top of the bridge.

Golden Bridge, Vietnam

Inaugurated in 2018, the Golden Bridge (Cầu Vàng in Vietnamese) boasts a most surprising architecture. This pedestrian walkway, located in Da Nang, appears to be supported by two enormous hands. Rising to a height of 1,000 metres (3,280 feet), this Vietnamese structure offers a stunning view of the surrounding mountains.

Juscelino Kubitschek Bridge, Brazil

Named in honour of a former Brazilian president, the “JK” Bridge displays an asymmetrical architectural prowess. Its curved design was inspired by the ricochets of a stone skipping across water. The modern structure stretches 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mile) across Lake Paranoá.

Root Bridges, India

The root bridges found in India’s Meghalaya forest seem straight out of an adventure novel. Known as one of the world’s wettest regions, Cherrapunji is home to no fewer than 11 living bridges, all perfectly functional and used by locals.

Navajo Bridge, Arizona

There are only seven ways to get across the 1,200-kilometre-long (750-mile-long) Colorado River in the United States. One, the splendid Navajo Bridge in Arizona, is actually a double structure. The old Navajo Bridge, replaced by a wider and more robust construction in 1995, was never destroyed. It now serves as a pedestrian crossing.

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