When is the next travel review? 12 potential green list countries ahead of announcement

Travel: Calder discusses potential green list countries

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The Government has categorised countries into a traffic light system in order to permit international travel as lockdown restrictions end. Classed as either green, amber or red countries response to the pandemic, vaccination efforts, ability to identity Covid variants and hospitalisations from the virus are all taken into account.

Countries on the red list would see entrants into the UK quarantine in a managed hotel, with two required Covid tests.

Returning from amber countries means arrivals must quarantine at home or in the place you are staying for 10 days.

They also need to take a COVID-19 test on or before day two and on or after day eight.

And for those returning to England from green list countries they must take a COVID-19 test on or before day two after you arrive.

Read More: TUI cancels more June holidays due to ‘ongoing uncertainty’

No quarantine is required unless testing positive or contact is made by NHS Test & Trace.

The current green list includes

  • Australia
  • Brunei
  • Falkland Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Gibraltar
  • Iceland
  • Israel and Jerusalem
  • New Zealand
  • Portugal (including the Azores and Madeira)
  • Singapore
  • South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha

However, some countries on the list, including Australia, are currently not permitting travellers.

The top destinations for Brits right now are Portugal, Gibraltar and Iceland, with holidaymakers hoping more destinations are added to the green list in time for summer.

When is the next travel update?

Government plans stipulate the travel rules would be reviewed every three weeks.

The first review of the Government’s green list of overseas destinations is due to take place on June 3.

This would see any changes take place a week later, on June 10 at 4am.

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Which countries could be added to the green list?

With scarce choices for holidaymakers, more countries on the green list could pave the way for trips abroad this summer.

There is no clear indication of which countries will or won’t make the cut, however, some areas are doing better than others in terms of Covid cases, vaccinations and response to variants.

Potential green list countries include

  • Malta
  • Finland
  • Grenada
  • The Cayman Islands
  • Fiji
  • The British Virgin Islands
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • Anguilla

And some EU counties islands could also make the cut, including

  • Canary Islands
  • Rhodes
  • Kos
  • Zante
  • Corfu
  • Crete

However, for those wishing to jet off to mainland Spain, Italy or Greece it may be some time before these countries make it to the green list.

Data has shown Spain’s 14-day average infection rate is currently around 139.71 per 100,000 of the population.

Italy’s 135.77 per 100,000 and Greece’s 259.36.

To compare, Portugal – a green list country – has an infection rate of 55.60 per 100,000 and was lower at approximately 49 first added to the green list.

However, travel bosses are eager for more European countries to be added to the green list after more than a year of travel uncertainty.

EasyJet boss John Lundgren said: “You have a number of countries in Europe that are now on the amber list that should go into the green list.”

And Spain’s tourism minister, Fernando Valdes, has said he hopes at least parts of the country would be added to the green list.

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